Speakers

Proteomics

From Genes to Functions

September 26, 2024
Stanford University

Proteomics

From Genes to Functions

09/26/24

Stanford University

RNA Delivery

Mult Omics Integration and Applications

In Vivo Gene Editing

Advances in Post-Translational Modifications

Speakers

Michael Snyder

Michael Snyder, PhD

Dr. Michael Snyder is the Stanford W. Ascherman Professor and Chair of the Genetics Department at Stanford Medicine. He was recruited by Stanford in 2009 to chair the Genetics Department and direct the Center for Genomics and Personalized Medicine. Under his leadership U.S. News & World Report has ranked Stanford University first in Genetics, Genomics, and Bioinformatics every year for the past decade. As the leading pioneer of 21st century healthcare, Dr. Snyder invented and significantly advanced many industry-standard approaches to personalized medicine. Most recently his research involving longitudinal baseline profiling and state-of-the-art “omic” technologies research has greatly accelerated the advancement of precision medicine. As an entrepreneur, Dr. Snyder’s co-founded companies have collectively raised $242 million in venture capital and are worth more than $6 billion in value. Dr. Snyder also serves on the board for a number of other companies.
Jennifer-Doudna

Vera Ignjatovic, PhD

Vera Ignjatovic, PhD, MBA, is Professor at the Department of Pediatrics, Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and an Associate Director for Translational Research at the Johns Hopkins All Children’s Institute for Clinical and Translational Research. Dr. Ignjatovic is internationally recognized, highly respected, strong and influential leader with 23 years of experience in medical research, life sciences, and healthcare innovation. Operating at the intersection of life science, clinical practice, and medical research, with expertise spanning translational strategy, from the identification of biomarkers in clinical studies, to all aspects of pre-clinical and clinical drug development. Highly skilled in building strong and mutually beneficial partnerships with multi-disciplinary and multi-sector stakeholders, including with the pharmaceutical industry, and life sciences, to enable significant improvements in child health. Dr. Ignjatovic holds leadership roles in international scientific organizations, including the Human Proteome Organisation, HUPO (Member of the Executive), and the International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis, ISTH (Chair, Physiological Anticoagulants and Thrombophilia Subcommittee of the Scientific Standardization Committee (SSC); member of the Adherence Working Party of the Pediatric Subcommittee of the SSC). She is a member of the editorial board, and section editor for Thrombosis and Haemostasis. She represents diverse needs of members, and spearheads global membership growth and outreach, with responsibility for organizational sustainability. Naturally business-focused and pragmatic, Dr. Ignjatovic challenges pre-existing paradigms and views problems holistically, with strong skills in interpreting, synthesizing, and communicating complex scientific and business issues into practical strategies and protocols.

Jennifer-Doudna

David R. Walt, PhD

David R. Walt is the Hansjörg Wyss Professor of Bioinspired Engineering at Harvard Medical School, Professor of Pathology at Brigham and Women’s Hospital and Harvard Medical School, Core Faculty Member of the Wyss Institute at Harvard University, Associate Member at the Broad Institute, and is a Howard Hughes Medical Institute Professor. Walt is the Scientific Founder of Illumina Inc., Quanterix Corp., and has co-founded multiple other life sciences startups including Ultivue, Inc., Arbor Biotechnologies, Sherlock Biosciences, Vizgen, Inc., and Torus Biosciences. He has received numerous national and international awards and honors for his fundamental and applied work in the field of optical microwell arrays and single molecules including the 2023 National Academy of Engineering’s Fritz J. and Dolores H. Russ Prize and the 2021 Kabiller Prize in Nanoscience and Nanomedicine. His lab’s research focuses on creating and using novel technologies to solve unmet clinical diagnostics problems. He is a member of the U.S. National Academy of Engineering, the U.S. National Academy of Medicine, a Member of the American Philosophical Society, a Fellow of the American Academy of Arts and Sciences, a Fellow of the American Institute for Medical and Biological Engineering, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors, and is inducted in the US National Inventors Hall of Fame.

Jennifer-Doudna

Jessica A Lasky-Su, DSc, MS

Dr. Lasky-Su is an Associate Professor of Medicine and an Associate Statistician at Harvard Medical School and Brigham and Women’s Hospital (BWH). With over two decades of experience, her research has concentrated on the analysis of genetics, genomics, and metabolomics data, particularly in relation to complex diseases such as asthma, allergies, and lung disease. A significant portion of Dr. Lasky-Su’s work has been dedicated to “integrative metabolomics,” which involves the integration of various omics disciplines with a metabolomics-centric perspective. Her research encompasses a broad spectrum of disease outcomes, including cancers, respiratory and ocular conditions, infections, metabolic disorders, and neurodevelopmental/mental health issues. She has also studied diverse exposures, such as air pollutants, PFAS, nutrition, and exercise. Dr. Lasky-Su has held several prominent leadership positions. She is the immediate past president of the Metabolomics Society, the largest society of its kind globally, and the chairperson of the NIH’s Consortium of Metabolomics Studies (COMETS), the largest international consortium of prospective metabolomics cohorts. Currently, she leads the RECOVER systems biology initiative through NHLBI, which utilizes multi-omic data to characterize Post-Acute Sequelae of SARS-CoV-2 (PASC). Throughout her career, Dr. Lasky-Su has trained over 25 postdoctoral fellows, many of whom have achieved successful academic careers, reaching ranks as high as Full Professor. Her academic achievements are evidenced by her authorship of over 250 peer-reviewed publications and her delivery of more than 60 national and international talks.

Jennifer-Doudna

Yingming Zhao, PhD

Dr. Yingming Zhao earned his Ph.D. degree from Rockefeller University in 1997, studying under Professor Brian Chait. From 1998 to 2008, he held positions as an Assistant and Associate Professor at both Mount Sinai School of Medicine and UT Southwestern Medical Center. He currently holds the Louis Block Professorship in the Ben May Department for Cancer Research at the University of Chicago. Dr. Zhao’s research is primarily dedicated to developing and applying mass spectrometry-based proteomics technologies, alongside various chemical and biological tools, to identify and investigate previously undescribed cellular pathways. Currently, he concentrates on those pathways related to protein post-translational modifications (PTMs) and epigenetic mechanisms. In the past 15 years, his team discovered 13 types of new lysine acylation pathways that are intimately connected to cellular metabolism. They also identified about 1,000 new histone marks, more than doubling the number of the previously known histone marks discovered during the first forty years of chromatin biology. His works revealed numerous enzymes that can add or remove the new PTM pathways, and identified specific binding proteins (or “readers’) for the novel histone marks. They also identified a new class of enzymes that can catalyze the synthesis of short-chain lipid CoAs which serve as co-factors for lysine acylations. His laboratory’s findings demonstrate the crucial roles of these newly discovered PTM pathways in epigenetic regulation and cellular pathophysiological changes. They have shown that these pathways contribute to various inborn metabolic diseases, affect the cellular microenvironment, including conditions like hypoxia, and play significant roles in the functions of immunological cells. He has co-authored 187 peer-reviewed papers. He is a co-founder and serves on the Scientific Advisory Board of three biotechnology companies.

Roodgar Morteza

Lihua Jiang, PhD

Lihua Jiang directs the mass spectrometry center for the Integrated Personal Omics Profiling and the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) projects. She is trained in medicine and obtained her Ph.D in analytical chemistry. She has extensive experience in mass spectrometry based quantitative proteomics and metabolomics. Lihua has developed and validated a variety of quantitative methods for the study of different cell lines, human organs and plasma/serum samples and constructed a quantitative proteome map of human body. Recently she has developed analytical methods for ultra-low volume samples from microsample devices and single cells. She has also built the platform for spatial single cell proteomics and metabolomics. She is an expert in mass spectrometry technologies and truly believes that the integration of modern technologies with omics profiling will revolutionize medicine.

Jennifer-Doudna

Neil L. Kelleher, PhD

Neil L. Kelleher, PhD is the Walter and Mary Glass Professor of Molecular Biosciences and professor of chemistry in the Weinberg College of Arts and Sciences. He also is director of the 50-person Proteomics Center of Excellence, Director of the Chemistry of Life Processes Institute and a member of the Robert H. Lurie Comprehensive Cancer Center of Northwestern University. His research is focused in the areas of top-down proteomics, natural products discovery, and cancer biology. With >450 papers, Dr. Kelleher is a cross-disciplinary investigator with international impact in proteomics (the study of proteins).  Together with colleagues in a research consortium (https://www.topdownproteomics.org/), this emerging approach to measure proteins with complete molecular specificity is being advanced to improve the detection and assignment of function to protein modifications and complexes. Now with an H-index of 90, Kelleher has mentored over 52 Ph.D. students, >200 postdoctoral scholars, and >200 undergraduates. After a breakthrough Nature paper in 2011, Kelleher has continued to push the boundaries of proteomics, most recently culminating in a publication in Science (2022, 375: 411-418). Perspectives published by Kelleher and a consortium of like-minded researchers over the last decade articulating the value of proteoforms and a landmark project to map all proteoforms in the human body (Sci. Adv. 2021, 7: eabk0734) typify their thought leadership in a field seeing a new crescendo of interest and activity in the 2020s. This “domestication” of the human proteome via precise compositional mapping will improve the efficiency of basic and clinical research and therefore enhance diverse goals for the 21st Century, including designer organs, personalized medicine, and early detection of human disease. A serial entrepreneur, he has spun out successful companies and recently co-founded two new ones. His contributions have been recognized by multiple awards, including the Biemann Medal from the American Society for Mass Spectrometry, the Donald F. Hunt Distinguished Contribution in Proteomics award from the US Human Proteome Organization, the Pfizer Award in Enzyme Chemistry from the American Chemical Society, and a Searle Scholar Award.

Jennifer-Doudna

Kathleen Poston, MD, MS

Dr. Kathleen Poston is the Edward F. and Irene Thiele Pimley Professor in Neurology and Neurological Sciences and (by courtesy) Neurosurgery at Stanford University. She received her Bachelor’s of Science in Bioengineering at the University of Pennsylvania, her Master’s Degree in Biomedical Engineering and her MD at Vanderbilt University. She completed her Neurology residency training at UCSF, completed a fellowship in clinical Movement Disorders at Columbia University and post-doctoral research training in Functional Neuroimaging at the Feinstein Institute. Dr. Poston’s research and clinical emphasis is biomarker development to study the motor and non-motor impairments symptoms, such as dementia, that develop in patients with Parkinson’s disease and Lewy body dementia. Dr. Poston is Chief of the Movement Disorders Division and holds an appointment in the Memory Disorders division. She is a founding member of the Stanford Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center and co-Director for the Lewy Body Dementia Association Research Center of Excellence at Stanford University, and Director of the Stanford Parkinson’s Foundation Center of Excellence.

Jennifer-Doudna

Liwei Zheng, PhD

Dr. Liwei Zheng is currently a research scientist in Prof. H. Tom Soh’s lab at Stanford University. Liwei received his Ph.D. from Johns Hopkins University, where he studied the mechanism of oxidative DNA damage. He joined Prof. H. Tom Soh’s lab as a postdoc in late 2018, and his research has been focused on developing tools for next-generation protein sequencing. His recent preprint demonstrated a method that chemoenzymatically “reverse translates” peptide sequences into DNA, which enables the amplification of peptide sequence information and sequencing of peptides at ultrahigh sensitivity.

Proteomics
From Genes to Functions

September 26, 2024 – Stanford University

From Genes to Functions

09/26/24
Stanford University

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